thebaconsandwichofregret:

The most British British ever to have Britished.

(Source: lightrains, via valinaraii)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 203,528 notes.

thewaltzingdead said: Hi, Mr. Gaiman. I am feeling inexplicably sad today. There's no trigger, it just happens - some days worse than the others. Any words of comfort, just anything to get me through this episode? :(

neil-gaiman:

Stephen Fry said it so much better than I ever could…

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2009/10/it-will-be-sunny-one-day.html

April 10, 2006

Dear Crystal,

I’m so sorry to hear that life is getting you down at the moment. Goodness knows, it can be so tough when nothing seems to fit and little seems to be fulfilling. I’m not sure there’s any specific advice I can give that will help bring life back its savour. Although they mean well, it’s sometimes quite galling to be reminded how much people love you when you don’t love yourself that much. 

I’ve found that it’s of some help to think of one’s moods and feelings about the world as being similar to weather:

Here are some obvious things about the weather:

It’s real.
You can’t change it by wishing it away. 
If it’s dark and rainy it really is dark and rainy and you can’t alter it. 
It might be dark and rainy for two weeks in a row.

BUT

It will be sunny one day.
It isn’t under one’s control as to when the sun comes out, but come out it will. 
One day.

It really is the same with one’s moods, I think. The wrong approach is to believe that they are illusions. They are real. Depression, anxiety, listlessness - these are as real as the weather - AND EQUALLY NOT UNDER ONE’S CONTROL. Not one’s fault. 

BUT 

They will pass: they really will.

In the same way that one has to accept the weather, so one has to accept how one feels about life sometimes. “Today’s a crap day,” is a perfectly realistic approach. It’s all about finding a kind of mental umbrella. “Hey-ho, it’s raining inside: it isn’t my fault and there’s nothing I can do about it, but sit it out. But the sun may well come out tomorrow and when it does, I shall take full advantage.”

I don’t know if any of that is of any use: it may not seem it, and if so, I’m sorry. I just thought I’d drop you a line to wish you well in your search to find a little more pleasure and purpose in life. 

Very best wishes

(Signed)

Stephen Fry

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 5,211 notes.

Annabel Lee, Edgar Allen Poe

My favorite Poe poem :)

(Source: , via booklover)

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OH NO

I just started watching Once Upon a Time… 

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 0 notes.
asoiafuniversity:

Why Sansa Stark’s Dress From Last Night’s ‘Game Of Thrones’ Was The Most Perfect Costume Choice Of All Time
By Rosie Narasaki, bustle.com

Sansa’s done more than learn from her captor/torturer/style icon Cersei: It looks like the student has surpassed the master. Because remember when Oberyn Martell told Tyrion how Cersei had tried and failed at emotional manipulation with him? Well, Sansa just categorically won all the emotional manipulation awards ever on Sunday’s episode — and she made sure to dress accordingly.
After almost three full seasons of being a powerless hostage, Sansa’s finally talking back. We first saw a glimpse of it a few weeks ago when she tearfully told Aunt Lysa that Littlefinger hadn’t tried anything with her (and he hadn’t… yet) — she used her admittedly tragic past to her advantage to convince Aunt Lysa that she had no designs on him.
And this week, she takes it a step further, conflating truth and fiction so very seamlessly that she’s able to successfully convince a whole panel of suspicious Eyrie elders of Littlefinger’s innocence. It’s a masterful move (both by Sansa herself and actor, Sophie Turner), and her calculated, through-crocodile-tears-look at Littlefinger shows us that she’s playing with the big leagues now.
Her subsequent scene with him (“I know what you want”) adds feathers (no pun intended) to her cap, and her dress clinches it. Sansa’s always been a survivor, but this is a dress that lets us know she’s playing the infamously life-or-death game of thrones for keeps.

Sure, it’s unfortunate that the ever-creepy Littlefinger is the ally she chooses, but at least we know she’s making very calculated risks — because it’s not blind loyalty or even fear that drove her to save him, but an aptitude for self-preservation and manipulation that we only wish her mom and dad had. And it’s this Maleficent-worthy dress that seals the deal — or rather, puts the nails in the coffins of her enemies.
It’s the perfect marriage between character development and costuming. Major props to the Game of Thrones costume department for creating the dress of the season (it even beats Dany’s post-Daario dress, and Margaery’s roses-and-thorns wedding dress, IMHO). It’s a character-defining dress that has rightfully taken over Twitter, Tumblr, and just about every GoT recap, ever — and I’m sure we’ll be seeing it on scores of future cosplayers to come.

asoiafuniversity:

Why Sansa Stark’s Dress From Last Night’s ‘Game Of Thrones’ Was The Most Perfect Costume Choice Of All Time

By Rosie Narasaki, bustle.com

Sansa’s done more than learn from her captor/torturer/style icon Cersei: It looks like the student has surpassed the master. Because remember when Oberyn Martell told Tyrion how Cersei had tried and failed at emotional manipulation with him? Well, Sansa just categorically won all the emotional manipulation awards ever on Sunday’s episode — and she made sure to dress accordingly.

After almost three full seasons of being a powerless hostage, Sansa’s finally talking back. We first saw a glimpse of it a few weeks ago when she tearfully told Aunt Lysa that Littlefinger hadn’t tried anything with her (and he hadn’t… yet) — she used her admittedly tragic past to her advantage to convince Aunt Lysa that she had no designs on him.

And this week, she takes it a step further, conflating truth and fiction so very seamlessly that she’s able to successfully convince a whole panel of suspicious Eyrie elders of Littlefinger’s innocence. It’s a masterful move (both by Sansa herself and actor, Sophie Turner), and her calculated, through-crocodile-tears-look at Littlefinger shows us that she’s playing with the big leagues now.

Her subsequent scene with him (“I know what you want”) adds feathers (no pun intended) to her cap, and her dress clinches it. Sansa’s always been a survivor, but this is a dress that lets us know she’s playing the infamously life-or-death game of thrones for keeps.

Sure, it’s unfortunate that the ever-creepy Littlefinger is the ally she chooses, but at least we know she’s making very calculated risks — because it’s not blind loyalty or even fear that drove her to save him, but an aptitude for self-preservation and manipulation that we only wish her mom and dad had. And it’s this Maleficent-worthy dress that seals the deal — or rather, puts the nails in the coffins of her enemies.

It’s the perfect marriage between character development and costuming. Major props to the Game of Thrones costume department for creating the dress of the season (it even beats Dany’s post-Daario dress, and Margaery’s roses-and-thorns wedding dress, IMHO). It’s a character-defining dress that has rightfully taken over Twitter, Tumblr, and just about every GoT recap, ever — and I’m sure we’ll be seeing it on scores of future cosplayers to come.

(via this-too-too-sullied-flesh)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 3,090 notes. .
'I put my life in the Red Viper’s hands, and he dropped it.'
When he remembered, too late, that snakes had no hands, Tyrion began to laugh hysterically.
George RR Martin, A Storm of Swords (via xmorgensternx)

(Source: champagne-svpernxva)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 219 notes.
Lord Byron, no
Everyone who knew him, probably (via fyeahgothicromance)

(Source: saddragonagetrash, via this-too-too-sullied-flesh)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 5,013 notes.
I sound my barbaric yawp over the rooftops of the world.
Walt Whitman
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A few months back, I was asked to participate in a debate on the topic of whether men should have to pay on dates. (I was “the feminist.”) It turned out that the male debater and I didn’t really disagree much on that topic. I said that, generally, whoever asks the other person out pays for that date, and then at some point couples generally transition into sharing costs in whatever way works for them. He was actually pretty happy to pay for first dates; he just wanted women to say thank you and to not use him. I had no problem with that.

I think he said that women should offer to pay half, knowing they’ll probably be turned down. I said, well, sometimes — but what if the other person invited you someplace really expensive? What if you agreed to a date with the guy and he spent an hour saying crazy racist shit to you and you felt like you couldn’t escape? This is what led to our real disagreement.

The male debater felt strongly that if a woman wasn’t interested in a second date, she should say so on the spot. If the man says, “Let’s do this again sometime,” the woman shouldn’t say, “Sure, great,” and then back out later. I said that that was a nice ideal, but that he should keep in mind that most women spent most of their lives living in low-level fear of physical aggression from men. I think about avoiding rape (or other violence) every time I walk home from the subway, every time there’s an unexpected knock at the door, and certainly every time I piss off an unhinged man. So, if I were on a date with a man who I felt was unbalanced, creepy, overly aggressive, or possibly violent, and he asked if I wanted to “do this again sometime,” I would say whatever I felt would avoid conflict. And then I would leave, wait awhile, and hope that letting him down politely a few days later would avoid his finding me and turning my skin into an overcoat.

The male debater was furious that I had even brought this up. He felt that the threat of violence against women was irrelevant, and that I was playing some kind of “rape card” as a debate trick. He got angrier and angrier as we argued. I also got angrier and angrier, although I worked hard to keep speaking in a calm and considered way. He was shouting and cutting me off when I tried to speak. I pointed out that the debater himself was displaying exactly the sort of behavior that would make me very uncomfortable on a date. THAT made him livid.

He then called me “passive-aggressive.”

I was genuinely taken aback. “Actually,” I said, “I call this ‘behaving myself.’” It’s a lot of work to stay calm when you’re just as furious as the other person, and that other person is shouting at you. I felt that I was acting like a grownup — at some emotional cost to myself — and I wanted credit, not insults, for being able to speak in a normal tone of voice when I was having to explain things like, “We can’t tell who the rapists are before they turn violent, so sometimes we have to be cautious with men who do not intend to harm us.”
Bullish Life: When Men Get Too Emotional To Have A Rational Argument (via brutereason)

(via rememo)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 60,204 notes.
Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.
Sylvia Plath (via eutro)

(Source: raccoonwounds, via booklover)

This was posted 4 months ago. It has 192,549 notes.

iguanamouth:

something about memories

(via booksandghosts)

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 213,763 notes.

Game of Thrones Drinking Game that leads me to texting my ex and “catching up”:

Drink:

-every time Stannis looks stern

-every time Cersei manipulates someone

-every time Brienne is unlady-like

-every time John Snow swings a sword

-every time Bran deviates from the plot (in the books)

…aaaaaaaah we are all sorts of caught up with our ex, now aren’t we?.

…note to self. No more GOT drinking games. You’ll run out of exes…

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 0 notes.

gomitoli:

Shakespeare & Co. bookstore, Paris on Flickr.

One night when I was lonely and angry, I ended up here around 10. I went upstairs and started reading Crime and Punishment until I was a little less lonely and a little less angry. 

(via superbooked)

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 6,121 notes.

"The Type" by Sarah Kay (by speakeasynyc)

This was posted 5 months ago. It has 2 notes.
The Strange Triumph of 'The Little Prince' : The New Yorker
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